Convictions insurance FAQs

All your questions about criminal convictions insurance, answered online
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What happens if I don’t disclose a conviction?

What happens to my information?

Can I speak to someone about disclosing criminal convictions?

Can my insurer find out if I have a criminal record?

What if I took insurance out in my partner's name?

Why is insurance more expensive with a conviction?

What if I break the terms of my probation?


What happens if I don’t disclose a conviction?

Sharing the details of any unspent convictions allows insurers to accurately assess the risk involved in underwriting the policy. It allows your insurer to provide an accurate quote to be able to protect your home in the event of a claim. If you are found to have deliberately misled your insurance provider then your claim won’t be paid.

It should be noted that spent convictions do not need to be disclosed.

What happens to my information?

Customer data is not shared with other companies, individuals or organisations. Any necessary details about criminal convictions that are pertinent to your home insurance are kept on file as part of your policy agreement. Your data is secure and stored in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1988.

Can I speak to someone about disclosing criminal convictions?

We are able to provide an online quote in the majority of cases, even for customers with convictions. However, if you are more comfortable speaking with one of our trained agents then they can discuss conviction types and the impact this might have on your home insurance.

Can my insurer find out if I have a criminal record?

The short answer is yes. And they will, but they may not check until you actually come to make a claim. In which case, if they discover that you have unspent convictions (if you have not fully discharged your rehabilitation period), then your insurance policy may become void because you failed to declare them when the policy started.

What if I took insurance out in my partner's name?

You cannot avoid declaring unspent criminal convictions, if asked. The questions asked apply to everyone living in the household, not just the policy holder. Whether you are living in someone else’s household, or you have someone with an unspent criminal conviction living in yours, you are still required to provide information when asked for it.

Why is insurance more expensive with a conviction?

People with convictions may may fall victim to retaliation from someone in their past, which means insurance providers may consider them a higher risk. That said, insurance providers use a vast and varied set of data to gauge risk and determine your premium, only one of which is whether you have a conviction.

What if I break the terms of my probation?

Probation means you’re serving your sentence but you’re not in prison. You could be put on probation because you’re serving a community sentence, or because you have been released from prison on licence or on parole. While you're on probation, you may have to do unpaid work, complete an education or training course, get treatment for addictions, like drugs or alcohol, or have regular meetings with an ‘offender manager’. If you break these or other terms of your probation, you could be taken back to court, and you could be taken back to prison immediately if you've been released on license or parole. This is likely to present you with issues that you need to manage regarding your home.