Landlord insurance FAQs

All your questions about landlord insurance, answered online
Get a quote

Why do I need landlord insurance?

Do I need contents insurance for my let property?

Can I claim if my tenants default on payments?

I own several properties. Can I insure them all at once?

I’m a live-in landlord. Do I need insurance for lodgers?

What's the law regarding tenancy agreements?

How long should an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) last?

How can I get my property back?

What if the tenant refuses to leave?

Why not just leave my property empty?

What are my responsibilities as a landlord and what are my tenants responsible for?

What’s the difference between a residential and a commercial landlord?

Can I get landlord insurance for flats?

How much does landlord insurance cost?


Why do I need landlord insurance?

A standard home insurance policy is unlikely to be able to cover you adequately as there are a higher number of risks associated with your property. Landlord insurance is designed to take situations involving tenants into account.

Do I need contents insurance for my let property?

That depends. If you are renting an unfurnished property then you only need buildings insurance. However, if you are letting a furnished or part-furnished property then you should insure your contents. Your tenants should have their own insurance for personal belongings and furniture that they keep at the property.

Can I claim if my tenants default on payments?

HomeProtect Landlords Buildings insurance includes cover for loss of rental income if something happens to the let property and it becomes uninhabitable causing your tenants to move out, so you could claim if you need to. However, you can also take out additional cover in the form of our Landlord Rent Guarantee. This protects you against failed rent payments, and can support you when evicting non-paying tenants whilst protecting your rental income up to a maximum of £2,500 per month.

I own several properties. Can I insure them all at once?

We’re pleased to be able to offer cover to all residential landlords. Our policies are based on the particularities of the individual property as well as your details, and for that reason we do not provide blanket coverage. As no two buildings are the same, customers should take out a separate policy for each letting, one which has been specified to meet the needs of the property. We also cannot insure commercial landlords.

I’m a live-in landlord. Do I need insurance for lodgers?

Letting rooms in your home without informing your insurer could invalidate your policy. This means that any claim you make may be rejected. You should therefore take out insurance for homeowners with lodgers so that your lodger is factored into your cover.

What is the law regarding tenancy agreements?

When you rent out your property to a tenant, the tenancy agreement will usually be an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) unless you agree otherwise in writing, or the agreement is made outside the legislation governing ASTs.

In most cases, using an AST will mean that you have a guaranteed right to get your home back after six months should you need to. You can also charge rent at the current market rate and can repossess the property if your tenant falls behind on rent payments by at least two months (or 8 weeks). In addition, ASTs give you the power to evict any tenants that cause a nuisance to local people.

How long should an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) last?

You will have to agree how long your AST will last with your tenant, either for a set period (or 'fixed term' as it is also known), or you can agree to leave it open ended.

How can I get my property back?

An AST can be ended at any point after the initial six month period, assuming that any fixed term you originally agreed to is over. You are required to give your tenant a minimum of two months' notice in writing, to let them know you want your property back and to give them time to make arrangements to vacate. If you have grounds to do so, you might also end the tenancy at any time. These grounds might include anti-social behaviour by the tenant or damage caused to your property, as well as the rent arrears as mentioned above.

What if the tenant refuses to leave?

Most tenants leave when asked to, but if they do not then you cannot evict them yourself. You would need to apply through the County Court, though in some cases you can use an accelerated possession procedure which does not entail attendance at a court hearing.

Why not just leave my property empty?

A property standing empty for no real reason can lead to the loss of a great deal of potential revenue, plus a property costs money whether it is occupied or not. Council tax and unoccupied house insurance are necessary expenditures, plus you will need to invest in measures to prevent dilapidation and take additional security precautions. You also run the risk of vandalism, squatting, neighbourhood complaints and an elevated risk of accidental fire or arson occurring.

What are my responsibilities and what will my tenants be responsible for?

You will be responsible for undertaking repairs and maintaining the premises' heating, hot water, basins, baths and other sanitary installations. You will also need to ensure that the gas and electrical appliances provided are safe to use and that all furniture/furnishing you provide are fire safe. Your tenant is responsible for paying rent to you at the rate you agreed upon, usually paying for council tax and utilities unless you include them in the rent agreement. They are also responsible for taking proper care of your property.

What’s the difference between a residential and a commercial landlord?

The difference between a residential and a commercial landlord is to do with the type of property they let out and is not whether their activities as a landlord constitute their full-time occupation or not.

Residential landlords let out homes, which are also known as ‘residential properties’. Commercial landlords let out properties that are used for commercial purposes such as shops or offices.

Can I get landlord insurance for flats?

You can take out landlords buildings insurance and landlord contents insurance for flats that you let out. Landlords need to take out a separate policy for each flat. Note that, in general, the owner of the freehold of a set of flats will probably have buildings insurance for the entire building.

HomeProtect landlord buildings insurance can cover freehold properties that contain up to six leasehold flats provided that at least one freeholder uses one of the flats as their permanent home.

How much does landlord insurance cost?

The cost of a landlord’s insurance policy varies depending on the size, location and type of your property. The cost also varies depending on how much cover you take out, whether you opt to pay a little more to reduce your excess and whether you opt for any of the additional landlord cover options such as loss of rent cover or landlords legal expenses cover.